2016 April – Bruny Island to Wynyard

2016-04 - MONTHLY LOG STATISTICS

Total Sailing time : 75h33m (4533 minutes)
Travelled distance : 778.46 km (420.33 nm)
Average Speed : 10.30 km/h (5.56 knots)
Peak Speed : 20.01 km/h (10.80 knots) on 2016/04/16

2016-04-01 - FROM Bruny Island TO Hobart

Trip start : 2016/04/01 09:05:46 (Adjusted Local) (2016-03-31T23:05:46Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/01 13:51:24
Trip Duration : 4h45m (285 minutes)
Start Point : 147.381225,-43.199829
End Point : 147.334304,-42.884059
Travelled distance : 45.230 km (24.422 nm)
Average Speed : 9.52 km/h (5.14 knots)
Peak Speed : 12.78 km/h (6.90 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 35.318 km (19.070 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 7.43 km/h (4.01 knots)


Feeling pretty chuffed at having reached another state capital, we phoned Tasports to see if they had space in Constitution Dock for us, and what it would cost us. Plenty of room, they said, and it would cost us $115 for the week! That’s a fantastic rate, and it costs the same for monos or cats so they don’t discriminate which is nice. We arrived and tied up at Elizabeth Pier, and waited for a friendly chap to come down and give us a key and point us to where we would dock.

He soon arrived, and suggested that the lift-up bridge to allow us into Constitution Dock might not clear our rigging, but that we would be fine where we were. We were fine with that so credit card was swapped for keycard, and we were set for a week in Tasmania’s capital.

We relocated across to the visitors berths for the weekend to give the tall ships at our bow and stern a bit more room to get in and out. There were only a few other casual users so we didn’t feel too guilty. A visit to the Salamanca Markets on Saturday morning was a special kind of hell for David, but Colleen made the trip easier by not finding anything that she could use on the boat, so all was well.

On the Monday, we picked up a nice cheap hire car, and did some exploring. David went for a factory tour of the Cascade Brewery, and Colleen visited the Female Factory where convict women were housed. After that, we traveled out to visit MONA – the Museum of Old and New Art – on the recommendation of our daughter who had heard rave reviews.

Modern art is an acquired taste, and although there were some interesting pieces, a lot of it was garbage to us. Some pieces were confrontational, some were vulgar or had disturbing sexual imagery, and some looked like the artist was trying his or her best to emulate stuff you might make watching play school. Not for us.

One of the displays we could actually understand at MONA. You have to like modern art to enjoy it there.

One of the displays we could actually understand at MONA. You have to like modern art to enjoy it there.

Next day David went out shopping in the morning. Whitworths, Supercheap Auto, Bunnings, Jaycar, Brierly Marine all copped a hammering. Then it was off to Mount Wellington! At 1271m it get’s quite windy, and it was blowing a gale when we arrived. We climbed to the top of the summit and had a few minutes rest inside the enclosed lookout, then drove a little way back down the mountain where the wind was not quite as insane for David to take off on a bike ride back down.

His fold-up bike has seen a lot of use on our journey, but rarely has it gone so fast or had its brakes under such pressure as this. Colleen gave him a minute or so head start, but did not catch up to him until he had traveled 8km of the 10km road back down. He found it hard to wipe the grin off his face at the bottom.

David about to ride down Mt.Wellington. About 10km all downhill! 60km/h on a fold-up bike with small wheels!

David about to ride down Mt.Wellington. About 10km all downhill! 60km/h on a fold-up bike with small wheels!

We then spent some time wandering around the Tip Shop that David spotted the day before near the Female Factory. They had a lot of interesting stuff there, but unfortunately the tip had to close early due to the high winds (occ-health and safety!) so we were booted out. Having to hand the car back at the end of the day, a quick visit to Woollies to restock supplies was all we had time for.

Using some of the stuff picked up on the boat-shopping trip, David installed the repaired tramp. It’s always good not to have a gaping hole in your deck area!

Our portside tramp repaired and re-installed. Fantastic job! It looks a lot stronger now.

Our portside tramp repaired and re-installed. Fantastic job! It looks a lot stronger now.

We took a day to walk around Hobart and do the tourist things. We visited the Mawson Hut replica and the Maritime Museum which are both very close to the docks, then popped back into Woolies for a few things we forgot the day before.

Inside the replica of Mawson's Hut. We found it fascinating.

Inside the replica of Mawson’s Hut. We found it fascinating.

Dawn at Elizabeth Pier, Hobart.

Dawn at Elizabeth Pier, Hobart.

Dawn at Elizabeth Pier, Hobart.

Dawn at Elizabeth Pier, Hobart.

We actually hung around Hobart until the Sunday as there was some gale force winds forecast.

2016-04-10 - FROM Hobart TO Norfolk Bay VIA Yacht Club Fuel Jetty

Trip start : 2016/04/10 08:43:31 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-09T22:43:31Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/10 14:55:30
Travelling Time : 5h06m (306 minutes)
Trip Duration : 6h11m (371 minutes)
Start Point : 147.334426,-42.884170
End Point : 147.704437,-42.951190
Travelled distance : 53.591 km (28.937 nm)
Average Speed : 10.50 km/h (5.67 knots)
Peak Speed : 19.64 km/h (10.60 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 31.038 km (16.759 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 6.08 km/h (3.28 knots)


Popping into the yacht club to top up the diesel tanks, we squeezed 100 litres in before heading back out. The winds were still quite fresh, and we made good time.

2016-04-11 - FROM Norfolk Bay TO Dunalley Jetty VIA GROUNDING

Trip start : 2016/04/11 08:50:30 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-10T22:50:30Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/11 13:05:50
Travelling Time : 1h41m (101 minutes)
Trip Duration : 4h15m (255 minutes)
Start Point : 147.704605,-42.951221
End Point : 147.816406,-42.887859
Travelled distance : 12.203 km (6.589 nm)
Average Speed : 7.24 km/h (3.91 knots)
Peak Speed : 12.79 km/h (6.90 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 11.511 km (6.215 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 6.83 km/h (3.69 knots)


Approaching the swing bridge to enter Denison Canal at Dunelly.

Approaching the swing bridge to enter Denison Canal at Dunalley.

Next morning we headed across Norfolk Bay towards Dunalley to shoot through Denison Canal. All was going well until we lined up to head through the swing bridge and found the opening process was a bit slower than we might have hoped. Full reverse against a very swift tidal flow stopped us from losing a furler or a mast, but found us grounded just alongside the angled timbers on the right of the photo above. We were on a rising tide so there was a wait of a couple of hours, and with higher water David managed to use the winch to pull us off the obstruction and we were soon moving.

The customary toll is a beer and a coin, so we left a nice cold Crownie wrapped in a cooler and a shiny dollar on our trip through the bridge. Maybe we should have left him two beers for having to open the bridge twice because karma quickly jumped up and bit us on the bum.

Unfortunately, something had given our starboard rudder a bit of abuse in the grounding and the steering was not moving, and was locked full to port!! This is the reason mariners are given to using harsh language on occasion! We were being pulled through the quite tight canal by the strong current, and could only use port-starboard engines to maneuver. Colleen grabbed the controls and David dove for the tools to separate the rudders and give us a little more control. A couple of scrapes later the starboard rudder was still locked hard’a’port, but the port rudder was moving. We exited the canal and tied up at the town jetty.

Some more work with the tools had the rudder loose, and thanks to some forethought David had arranged for a chain link to be welded to the top of the stock so a line could be tied to it for removal on-water. Another dive saw the rudder pulled and out on the deck, and thanks to some awesome MacGuyver skills with a couple of chain hoists, the stock was soon reasonably straight again and after yet another cold swim had it re-installed and working as it should. It’ll need some fibreglass work and some antifoul though!

2016-04-12 - FROM Dunalley Jetty TO Carnarvon Bay Port Arthur

Trip start : 2016/04/12 06:33:13 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-11T20:33:13Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/12 14:43:22
Travelling Time : 7h29m (449 minutes)
Trip Duration : 8h10m (490 minutes)
Start Point : 147.816513,-42.887790
End Point : 147.853866,-43.150119
Travelled distance : 80.008 km (43.201 nm)
Average Speed : 10.69 km/h (5.77 knots)
Peak Speed : 16.30 km/h (8.80 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 29.327 km (15.835 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 3.91 km/h (2.11 knots)


An early-morning departure saw us make our way through the fish-farms and shallows of Blackman Bay. Turning the corner we hoisted sails and with a brisk breeze from just behind the beam we were scooting along. Another set of sails appeared on our right coming out of Eaglehawk Neck and of course the race was on. With the advantage of better winds away from the cliffs, David was still pleased to be pulling away, but naturally the winds soon swung around to be on the nose and we had to douse our sails and motor while the mono could point better. He was surprised to see that it was Helsal IV, a 62-foot ex-racer.

Rounding Tasman Island, the swell from the south was pretty nasty, and the trip became quite slow and uncomfortable. The last few miles seemed to take forever, but we soon found our way into Port Arthur, rounded The Island of the Dead, and were anchored in front of the prison.

At anchor at Port Arthur

At anchor at Port Arthur

Shortly after dropping the pick, the large ferry came by and gave us a few honks, and after disgorging all it’s passengers the pilot asked if we could pop around the corner as he liked to turn through where we had stopped. We upped anchor (requiring another dip from David to pull the anchor away from some obstruction) and grabbed a public mooring a few hundred metres away.

We spent the next couple of days exploring the Port Arthur ruins. Entry tickets allow two days access to the site, which is great for those who can stay overnight like us. We saw all that there was to see, and had a great time.

Having treatment in the remains of the Port Arthur convict hospital. The asylum a few hundred metres away might have been more appropriate.

Having treatment in the remains of the Port Arthur convict hospital. The asylum a few hundred metres away might have been more appropriate.

Looking out to the Island of the Dead, the convict cemetery island at Port Arthur

Looking out to the Island of the Dead, the convict cemetery island at Port Arthur

2016-04-15 - FROM Carnarvon Bay Port Arthur TO Port Arthur VIA Point Puer

Trip start : 2016/04/15 09:16:01 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-14T23:16:01Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/15 13:09:43
Travelling Time : 0h41m (41 minutes)
Trip Duration : 3h55m (235 minutes)
Start Point : 147.853591,-43.150581
End Point : 147.859344,-43.184951
Travelled distance : 6.428 km (3.471 nm)
Average Speed : 9.40 km/h (5.07 knots)
Peak Speed : 11.23 km/h (6.06 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 3.850 km (2.078 nm)


We popped over to explore the emains of the  Point Puer Boys Prison, before a short motor towards the ocean to give us a head start on the long sail tomorrow.

2016-04-16 - FROM Port Arthur TO Maria Island

Trip start : 2016/04/16 07:58:18 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-15T21:58:18Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/16 14:58:43
Trip Duration : 7h00m (420 minutes)
Start Point : 147.859313,-43.184860
End Point : 148.074645,-42.683498
Travelled distance : 81.261 km (43.877 nm)
Average Speed : 11.60 km/h (6.26 knots)
Peak Speed : 20.01 km/h (10.80 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 58.440 km (31.555 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 8.34 km/h (4.50 knots)


Swell was much reduced on this trip, and we enjoyed a nice sail north before turning into Maria Island for the night.

Rounding Tasman Island/Cape Pillar for the second time. Much less chop this time.

Rounding Tasman Island/Cape Pillar for the second time. Much less chop this time.

2016-04-17 - FROM Maria Island TO Wineglass Bay

Trip start : 2016/04/17 08:48:59 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-16T22:48:59Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/17 16:19:17
Trip Duration : 7h30m (450 minutes)
Start Point : 148.073043,-42.684600
End Point : 148.309524,-42.174789
Travelled distance : 70.936 km (38.302 nm)
Average Speed : 9.45 km/h (5.10 knots)
Peak Speed : 16.81 km/h (9.07 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 59.918 km (32.353 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 7.98 km/h (4.31 knots)


Wineglass Bay! Reputed to be among the best beaches in the world, the anchorage where we dropped anchor was crystal-clear, quiet, and pristine. A few hippie campers ashore past the treeline, but with fires not allowed they were pretty much in bed in there tents soon after dark.

After a nice night, we walked up the beach and took the trail up to the lookout. It’s quite a walk, but the trail is solid and there were plenty of travelers in both directions.

View from the lookout at Wineglass Bay, TAS

View from the lookout at Wineglass Bay, TAS

Coming back down the Wineglass Bay track.

Coming back down the Wineglass Bay track.

2016-04-19 - FROM Wineglass Bay TO Bicheno

Trip start : 2016/04/19 07:30:59 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-18T21:30:59Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/19 12:26:30
Trip Duration : 4h55m (295 minutes)
Start Point : 148.309631,-42.174888
End Point : 148.301498,-41.871261
Travelled distance : 39.055 km (21.088 nm)
Average Speed : 7.94 km/h (4.28 knots)
Peak Speed : 15.61 km/h (8.43 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 33.768 km (18.233 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 6.86 km/h (3.70 knots)


Continuing north, we stopped into Bicheno for a day. We were running short on ice-cream and booze, and wanted to do some laundry too. We initially thought we might squeeze alongside the town jetty, but it was quite tight in there and with a lot of weed floating around we were not keen on having to rely on the props working immediately we turned the motor over.

The town of Bicheno. That's XTsea on the extreme right.

The town of Bicheno. That’s XTsea on the extreme right.

2016-04-22 - FROM Bicheno TO St.Helens

Trip start : 2016/04/22 06:56:08 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-21T20:56:08Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/22 15:03:59
Trip Duration : 8h07m (487 minutes)
Start Point : 148.301757,-41.871200
End Point : 148.250762,-41.326519
Travelled distance : 81.162 km (43.824 nm)
Average Speed : 9.99 km/h (5.39 knots)
Peak Speed : 18.35 km/h (9.90 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 60.714 km (32.782 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 7.48 km/h (4.03 knots)


St.Helens was the next stop. The bar crossing and entry into the harbour is a bit tricky, but if you follow the channel markers you should be fine. We did get down to 1.2m which is not a lot of clearance for us.

A nice chap allowed us to use his second mooring so we were quite secure, and we stayed for a couple of days, did a little bit of shopping, some more laundry, and topped up the water tanks at the town jetty before heading off.

2016-04-25 - FROM St.Helens TO Eddystone Point VIA Binalong Bay

Trip start : 2016/04/25 07:25:31 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-24T21:25:31Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/25 14:59:24
Travelling Time : 4h17m (257 minutes)
Trip Duration : 7h33m (453 minutes)
Start Point : 148.251037,-41.326858
End Point : 148.341506,-40.998229
Travelled distance : 46.050 km (24.865 nm)
Average Speed : 10.75 km/h (5.80 knots)
Peak Speed : 16.81 km/h (9.07 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 37.318 km (20.150 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 8.71 km/h (4.70 knots)


Following our track back out to sea gave us a little bit more confidence, but our trip was interrupted by the start of a local fishing competition. Ten or so high-powered boats blasted past us on the way out.

There was a fishing contest starting as we left St.Helens. Prize for who burns the most petrol?

There was a fishing contest starting as we left St.Helens. Prize for who burns the most petrol?

Out at sea, there was no wind so we motored around the corner to the township of Binalong Bay. Happily, the wind picked up after lunch and off we went, dropping anchor the south side of Eddystone Point to be out of the NW winds. A few trawlers joined us overnight, with one boat leaving all his lights on full blast for the entire evening.

2016-04-26 - FROM Eddystone Point TO Waterhouse Island

Trip start : 2016/04/26 05:36:10 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-25T19:36:10Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/26 19:13:23
Travelling Time : 8h52m (532 minutes)
Trip Duration : 13h39m (819 minutes)
Start Point : 148.340866,-40.997978
End Point : 147.638442,-40.806320
Travelled distance : 80.829 km (43.644 nm)
Average Speed : 9.11 km/h (4.92 knots)
Peak Speed : 12.41 km/h (6.70 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 62.763 km (33.889 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 7.07 km/h (3.82 knots)


Mostly motoring or motor-sailing, the trip was interrupted a few times when the boat started shuddering. Bloody seaweed! There is a variety which comes in 3m lengths of 1cm diameter and it is tough! A quick swim sorts out the issue.

Second time this morning David has had to swim under the boat to clear the props of this rope-like seaweed.

Second time this morning David has had to swim under the boat to clear the props of this rope-like seaweed.

There was quite a tidal flow past Waterhouse Island, and we had to change position during the evening when the tide swung us into the shallows causing us to bump the bottom.

2016-04-27 - FROM Waterhouse Island TO Devonport

Trip start : 2016/04/27 07:32:21 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-26T21:32:21Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/27 16:38:03
Trip Duration : 9h05m (545 minutes)
Start Point : 147.638229,-40.806491
End Point : 146.368469,-41.189731
Travelled distance : 118.748 km (64.119 nm)
Average Speed : 13.07 km/h (7.05 knots)
Peak Speed : 19.02 km/h (10.27 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 114.764 km (61.967 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 12.63 km/h (6.82 knots)


Wind glorious wind! The forecast was 15-25 from the North, which gave us a perfect wind for a trip west. We headed for George Town on the Tamar River, but arriving shortly after lunch we decided to push on to Devonport. The wind dropped away when we were within a couple of miles of the township, but we were not far off from dropping sails anyway.  We motored up the river past the Spirit of Tasmania (and the much smaller Spirit of Devonport cylist ferry) and tried to find a spot to anchor in front of the yacht club. Someone eventually took pity on us and called us on the VHF to offer a mooring. We spent a wet, overcast day there stuck on board the boat as access ashore was very difficult. With some wind forecast for the following day, we decided to make a break for it at first light.

2016-04-29 - FROM Devonport TO Wynyard

Trip start : 2016/04/29 06:52:59 (Adjusted Local) (2016-04-28T20:52:59Z UTC)
Trip end : 2016/04/29 12:58:30
Trip Duration : 6h05m (365 minutes)
Start Point : 146.368576,-41.189731
End Point : 145.732757,-40.987468
Travelled distance : 62.95 km (33.99 nm)
Average Speed : 10.34 km/h (5.58 knots)
Peak Speed : 13.80 km/h (7.45 knots)
Straight-line Distance : 57.837 km (31.229 nm)
VMG Average Speed : 9.50 km/h (5.13 knots)

The wind was pretty light and there was no way we would make Stanley, so just before lunch we headed for Wynyard. A phone call to the yacht club suggested that we would be able to make it past the bar, and put us on to the chap in charge of the wharf, who could not have been more helpful. Some nervous moments on the approach as we had a small bump as we followed the lead line in, but backed off and were soon moving again.

The rain was pelting down by the time we started tying up, but we were soon secure and safe. Just as well, because a 40 knot gale was predicted for the Sunday.

We spent the Saturday exploring the town. They have a couple of terrific second-hand stores with all sorts of knick-knacks. Quite overpriced, and happily nothing that we can use on a boat, but if you are looking to dress a 1970’s movie-set then you have to pop in. A visit to the Wonders of Wynyard was terrific, with a collection of vintage cars from the early 1900’s. We spent a couple of hours in there! Then some shopping at Woollies and back to the boat.

Wonders of Wynyard. A display of some of the first autos ever built including a model A Ford from 1903.

Wonders of Wynyard. A display of some of the first autos ever built including a model A Ford from 1903.

 


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